6

67HEAVEN

Regular
Aug 23, 2010
603
9
Southcentral Ontario
VetteCoins
624
Car
1967 BBC coupe
What does it take to stir the loins of some of us ol' timer Corvette owners? The magic word "L-88". And, if it's one of the original twenty from 1967, we're now off the Richter Scale.

So, what's so special about this Corvette?
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The trained eye will take note that it appears to be a real L-88, or at least a well-done clone.

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But, ladies and germs, this ain't no clone. This is a very well documented original 1967 L-88 Corvette (1 of 20). Enough? Not by a long shot. Read on.

The following was published in Corvette News (the now defunct in-house GM publication) in the late 1970s, and is displayed here with permission.
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If you missed it in the above article, when brought back into the sunlight, this L-88 had exactly 11 miles on it. ELEVEN MILES. After passing through two hands, it was then offered for $12,000. TWELVE THOUSAND DOLLARS!!!

It now has 12 miles on it and sits in Rogers Corvette's collection in Florida - 1967 L-88 CORVETTE with just 12 MILES at Roger's Corvette Center

Wow, a whole one mile since the late 1970s and 12 miles since 1967. :nono: The last time it changed hands, it sold for $640,000 plus buyer's fee. Were Roger ever to decide to sell it, it would likely approach the $2,000,000 now.

And, here's the kicker - the original stamped engine short-block was replaced in 1975. WHAT? Say what?

If this isn't the most astounding Corvette story you've ever read, please tell yours. ;)

P.S. If you've never seen the cowl induction end of a real 1967 L-88 hood, be sure to go back and carefully study the hood in the first photo. Yes, Corvette actually offered three different hoods in 1967. ;)

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:seeya:
 
Great story Bob. I wonder if that guy has ever found out what happened to his car and what it's now worth? Oh, and did you know that some small block '67s were shipped from the factory with big block hoods? Seems there had been a problem with the mold for the small block hoods and instead of waiting for a fix, GM shipped the cars with the big block hood.
 
Any indication as to why the block was replaced or if it was still with the car? With a car as rare as that, it is still worth a lot of money to collectors, original engine or not.

To quote Roger Judski (current owner):

"In the process, it seemed like a good idea to someone to trade the engine block for a new short block in 1975."


:confused:

This is particularly hard to understand. Granted the entire drivetrain and suspension was disassembled until the first sale, as outlined in the Corvette News story. But, why would a vehicle that had only received 11 miles on the clock require a replacement of anything, never mind the short block?

Makes me wonder if the original owner perhaps damaged the engine trying to reassemble it. If not, where did a perfectly good (and like new) block go?

Obviously, there's plenty more to this story that those in the know are willing to talk about.

By the way, I read in the other low-mile '67 thread that someone here liked the white '67 Corvette. Did you all notice the white '67 parked beside this red L-88 in Roger's collection?

Yeah, the white one is a L-88 too. He owns two (and some say three) of the 20. Damn.
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I would MUCH rather have the 67heaven than an L88. You can drive them both but one would be MUCH funner than the other.

Actually, Riley, I'd trade for one in a heartbeat
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and not because of the dollar value.

I've made mine into a very close driving experience to a L-88, and I imagine that mine's somewhat faster (certainly on the top end), but there's nothing like the sound of 12.5:1 compression as it tries to crack a hole in the Earth. :D

One ride in a real L-88 and you'd settle for nothing less. You see, to me, Corvetteing is all about the sensory experience. I rarely have the radio on...can't hear it anyway. Don't have the air on......couldn't get A/C with these engines. I'm just old school. I love it rough, noisy and smelling like napalm in the morning. Bring it on, baby. If I wanted quiet, smooth and comfy, I'd have bought a Caddy.

Your preference may vary. :rofl:
 
I had a 66 427-425 and it was a bad ass ride! Sidepipes barking!

Scared a lot of car friends in it

Don't know how I'd handle a L88 or a Mountain motor like 67HEAVEN
 
The high compression engines definitely have a sharper exhaust note. Blip the throttle and the rpm come back down almost as fast as they went up. I'm amazed how they are able to get these new engines to run on pump gas. Our '05 is 10.9-1 compression and the 2014 is supposed to be 11.5-1. Compression is free horsepower if you can make it work. I had the timing backed off quite a ways to keep our old L78 from rattling on today's pump gas. I think that 67HEAVEN would definitely put a smile on my face. If I ever get sitting in that thing, you will need a crow bar to pry me out. ;)
 
Actually, Riley, I'd trade for one in a heartbeat
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and not because of the dollar value.

I've made mine into a very close driving experience to a L-88, and I imagine that mine's somewhat faster (certainly on the top end), but there's nothing like the sound of 12.5:1 compression as it tries to crack a hole in the Earth. :D

One ride in a real L-88 and you'd settle for nothing less. You see, to me, Corvetteing is all about the sensory experience. I rarely have the radio on...can't hear it anyway. Don't have the air on......couldn't get A/C with these engines. I'm just old school. I love it rough, noisy and smelling like napalm in the morning. Bring it on, baby. If I wanted quiet, smooth and comfy, I'd have bought a Caddy.

Your preference may vary. :rofl:

Preferences definitely do not vary! It's just a result of being young and not being able to experience the sound of such a rank engine. I absolutely love the sound of my Chevelle (especially with the headers open). These cars have a real sound of authority when pouring the fuel through them. It really does sound like it wants to tear your arms off.:rofl: I've never heard a 12.5 comp engine on the street and if I had, then I'm sure I would not have made that comment.:D However, 502 cubic inches has got to be something to behold (only to maybe be outdone by a 572:D). My dad would tell me about what sounds good when I was younger and it was always the big block cars. However, I still have to experience a built DZ 302 screaming at 8 or 10,000 rpm on the track as that is supposed to put chills down the spin as well.

I never listen to music in the Chevelle, or Corvette as the motor is music to my ears. No A/C in the Chevelle suits me just fine but I love it in the Vette. Once I get rid of the peg leg in the rear of the Chevelle, I hope to supplement that with electric cutouts to properly make some noise. (However, this will never be done near residential areas).
 
Most of you will be familiar with the 160 mph (257 km/h) midyear speedos.

Take note of this one.
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That's 322 km/h.

And this is one of the cars that speedo can be found in...
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One of the Sunray DX 1967 L-88 cars that raced at Lemans.

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You know, there's an old saying...."If it don't go, chrome it". See any chrome? :D

This car is another one of the 20 built in 1967. Due to its racing heritage, the value is off the scale.

P.S. Some of you may wonder why the heads are painted orange rather than being bare aluminum. It may lead you to wonder if the heads might be cast iron. Rest assured - they're aluminum. The factory painted them orange and they were shipped that way.

The photo also reveals why the L-88 was not truly emissions road-worthy. While all other Corvettes got at least a PCValve, the L-88 carried a road-draft tube (the black canister shoved in the driver's side cover) that simply dumped blow-by to the road. The car was intended for off-road use only.

You'll notice that mine is road-worthy. PCValve in place. ;)
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No. That's a L-71 (like mine was originally), not a L-88.

Although the L-88 was rated at 5hp less than the L-71, only Mother Teresa and Howdy Dowdy believe it. ;)
 
By the way, if that white convertible was a real L-88 with such low miles, you could probably add another zero to the end of the asking price.

:leaving:
 
Thanks Bob. I would have thought that the tri power setup would be more powerful. Guess it must be the 12 to 1 comp, bigger cam, headers and side pipes that make the real difference!
 
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