Paul 06 vette
Aug 3, 2013
209
199
Saint John N.B.
VetteCoins
3,676
Car
2013 427 Convertible
Just wandering what you think a 2015 convertable would be worth in 2022 when paid for ? I have been thinking of ordering 1 from ojamali. It is alot of money, almost the same payment as my mortage (which is almost done). Im just wandering what the value may be down the road. I know all cars depreciate. Thanks for any thoughts.
 
Sorry to say that Corvettes are not holding there value quite as well as they use to .But chances are it will always be worth something :D

Maybe I can meet ya at the Atlantic Nationals next year .
 
Our 2005 listed just under $68K. Seven years later we paid $31.5K and the car had just a little over 13K miles on the odometer. Calculate that depreciation per mile. The early '90s ZR1s can be bought for well less than $25K and they were super expensive when new. That depreciation is far worse. A low mileage one of these would probably be a good bet in the long term. It is better to let someone else take the depreciation. I worked too hard for my money to throw it away. I will be long gone from this world before any of these cars will have appreciated by any profitable amount.
Buy this and in a few years it should probably appreciate in value. http://www.kijiji.ca/v-cars-trucks/...or/1000291051?enableSearchNavigationFlag=true
Or this One: http://www.kijiji.ca/v-cars-trucks/...zr1/592459852?enableSearchNavigationFlag=true
 
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Our 2005 listed just under $68K. Seven years later we paid $31.5K and the car had just a little over 13K miles on the odometer. Calculate that depreciation per mile. The early '90s ZR1s can be bought for well less than $25K and they were super expensive when new. That depreciation is far worse. A low mileage one of these would probably be a good bet in the long term. It is better to let someone else take the depreciation. I worked to hard for my money to throw it away. I will be long gone from this world before any of these cars will have appreciated by any profitable amount.

I know they won't appreciate any. Im just trying to figure if the loss is worth it. I would love to own a brand new one, but it is around $80,000 and not sure if i want to loose $50,000 of its value by time i get it paid for. The $80,000 isnt counting interest.
 
My accountant is a car buff and closed his door before telling me that the purchase of a Corvette Z06 is not a financially responsible move. He told me that he was going to be cringing come time to do our taxes, and further, a Corvette simply isn't going to do anything but depreciate. If it were like most cars of similar stature, it will sit in the garage losing value and winters are even worse for true car lovers in Canada. It is a bad financial investment.

After listening to his whining for some time, he picked up the Z06 brochure I brought with me, studied it a bit more with eyes wide open and said, " If you change your mind and give it up, let me know. I want it."

Now remember... the Z06 is probably going to run 110-115K total at day's end. As much as one might consider only a few are coming to Canada and may retain their value (I dont believe this by the way), there is also the other side where Chevrolet is daring its competitors to beat their specs, which someone will do, resulting in lots of Supercars in the next few years...decreasing my babies value...

We do this simply for the love of our toys!
 
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Yeah, it's $80,000 but it's a 1/4 of the price of a Ferrari, and lots more fun to drive (not that I really know).

I too had to make that decision. save for retirement, pay mortgage, or buy a toy. I figure I will have it until I can't get in or out or until I'm gone. For me it's a once in a lifetime purchase. This is what I wanted and I wouldn't settle for anything else until I was able to afford it. I don't want to look back in ten years and wish I may, wish I might, wish I could have.

If things get tough, I'll sell it:(
 
You could very well be right on that one. One thing though, back in the old days, a lot of Corvettes were driven winter and summer and eventually ended up in the bone yard. Today not many are driven in the winter so a lot more are staying near pristine. With the old ones not going away and more new ones every year, there is a possibility of a slightly bloated market eventually. Even now, if I were to write our car off, I could have pretty well what I want within a week. Prices haven't gone through the floor by any means but I dare say that our '05 is still depreciating about $2K a year. I'm not a very good predictor so perhaps I am all wet.
 
The only problem is, " Jonas" is not a Car Guy". he is talking everyday run of the mill transporters.

My Cars, and Yours , Do not follow these trends.

It may take some time, BUT, the value of Our Corvettes will increase over time.

A limited production super car that consistently beats the Europeans and can be a daily driver with outstanding fuel mileage can only appreciate in value.
 
You are probably right about the trends and Jonas was talking about the every day car and he is a numbers cruncher. Our car is practically our every day car all summer. I call it our three door hatchback economy car grocery getter. About the only thing these cars are not good at is going in through the woods to the hunt camp. We don't plan on getting rid of ours any time soon so it doesn't matter where the prices go. The big depreciation is past but it will be many years before they gain any amount of value. We had a COPO Chevelle that I bought new. It is only in recent years that they really took off. With about 323 made, they are rare and it still took a lot of years for them to go through the roof. We're going to keep on enjoying our car for as long as we can. It fits the bill perfectly for us. If the value goes up then it will be a welcome bonus.
 
I usually do not buy a new car. My 2014 C7 was the second new car I'd bought in 20 years, he other a 2011 Jetta TDI since the used prices of those were so high.

I plan on keeping this car for at least 10 years, so if it's worth 25-30k then then it only cost me 37-42k for 10 years of fun. I'd much rather spend the 6k a year ( 4k dep, 1k ins, 1k maint) then go on any fancy trip or anything else. And I'm okay with loosing the interest the cash would have earned.
 
I am 63 years old and have had a passion for Vettes since first seeing the TV show Route 66. I have owned a 1971 LT1 coupe and 1965 327 roadster. The '71 was a blast while the '65 was a bust. But I digress.

My interest fell to indifference after the C3 series ended (no offence to C4, C5 and C6 owners). When the C7 arrived, I fell in love with the brand all over again. When I saw a velocity yellow Z51 up close at a Collingwood show and shine last May, the next week I ordered myself a 2015 coupe.

I still get some buyer's remorse because, with all taxes and extra warranties and fees and surcharges, the the total came to $87,300.47!!! Slapping down the credit card for the initial $1000.00 gets me in the Bowling Green queue was easy. Just $86,300.47 to go. Yikes! My first house didn't cost that much.

I am fortunate enough to have the remainder in cash to just buy outright. The long and short of it is I just don't care about the "investment". The depreciation will just not matter compared to the thrill of driving, not just a Corvette Stingray, but driving a brand spanking new Corvette Stingray. Mmmm, new car smell. There is nothing quite like new car smell.

Someone wise once said, do not buy things; buy experiences. A brand new Corvette Stingray is not a THING to me; it will be an experience. Driving it will be an experience. Polishing it will be an experience. Taking to car shows will be an experience. Going on Corvette cruizes will be an experience.

If buying yourself a Corvette means that by 2022 you will be eating Alpo or cannot pay the rent, then your choice is clear. Roof over head more important than 91 octane in fuel tank. However, if having KD and weiners or some other austerity meal affords you the amazing experience of a brand new Corvette Stingray, then run don't walk to your Chevy dealer and treat yourself to an experience not many will afford themselves.

My father never reached the age of 64. I am 63 - the same age as when my dad died. I refuse to allow myself to deny myself experiences for fear money may be tight later in life.

I totally agree. A Corvette Stingray is a bad investment; but it will be a once in a lifetime experience.

A great lady by the name of Admiral Grace Hopper of the U.S Navy once said "Ships in port are safe. But that is not what ships are for. Go out and experience new things." My father didn't; but I damn well will. If GM ever gets around to building the darn thing!!!!!!! Three months on order and still NO build date yet. Grrrr.

Just my $0.02

Doug in Collingwood
 
I am 63 years old and have had a passion for Vettes since first seeing the TV show Route 66. I have owned a 1971 LT1 coupe and 1965 327 roadster. The '71 was a blast while the '65 was a bust. But I digress.

My interest fell to indifference after the C3 series ended (no offence to C4, C5 and C6 owners). When the C7 arrived, I fell in love with the brand all over again. When I saw a velocity yellow Z51 up close at a Collingwood show and shine last May, the next week I ordered myself a 2015 coupe.

I still get some buyer's remorse because, with all taxes and extra warranties and fees and surcharges, the the total came to $87,300.47!!! Slapping down the credit card for the initial $1000.00 gets me in the Bowling Green queue was easy. Just $86,300.47 to go. Yikes! My first house didn't cost that much.

I am fortunate enough to have the remainder in cash to just buy outright. The long and short of it is I just don't care about the "investment". The depreciation will just not matter compared to the thrill of driving, not just a Corvette Stingray, but driving a brand spanking new Corvette Stingray. Mmmm, new car smell. There is nothing quite like new car smell.

Someone wise once said, do not buy things; buy experiences. A brand new Corvette Stingray is not a THING to me; it will be an experience. Driving it will be an experience. Polishing it will be an experience. Taking to car shows will be an experience. Going on Corvette cruizes will be an experience.

If buying yourself a Corvette means that by 2022 you will be eating Alpo or cannot pay the rent, then your choice is clear. Roof over head more important than 91 octane in fuel tank. However, if having KD and weiners or some other austerity meal affords you the amazing experience of a brand new Corvette Stingray, then run don't walk to your Chevy dealer and treat yourself to an experience not many will afford themselves.

My father never reached the age of 64. I am 63 - the same age as when my dad died. I refuse to allow myself to deny myself experiences for fear money may be tight later in life.

I totally agree. A Corvette Stingray is a bad investment; but it will be a once in a lifetime experience.

A great lady by the name of Admiral Grace Hopper of the U.S Navy once said "Ships in port are safe. But that is not what ships are for. Go out and experience new things." My father didn't; but I damn well will. If GM ever gets around to building the darn thing!!!!!!! Three months on order and still NO build date yet. Grrrr.

Just my $0.02

Doug in Collingwood

Well said Doug...

One of my favourite quotes:

The poorest of men can earn more money, but even the richest of men cannot buy more time.
 
I am 63 years old and have had a passion for Vettes since first seeing the TV show Route 66. I have owned a 1971 LT1 coupe and 1965 327 roadster. The '71 was a blast while the '65 was a bust. But I digress.

My interest fell to indifference after the C3 series ended (no offence to C4, C5 and C6 owners). When the C7 arrived, I fell in love with the brand all over again. When I saw a velocity yellow Z51 up close at a Collingwood show and shine last May, the next week I ordered myself a 2015 coupe.

I still get some buyer's remorse because, with all taxes and extra warranties and fees and surcharges, the the total came to $87,300.47!!! Slapping down the credit card for the initial $1000.00 gets me in the Bowling Green queue was easy. Just $86,300.47 to go. Yikes! My first house didn't cost that much.

I am fortunate enough to have the remainder in cash to just buy outright. The long and short of it is I just don't care about the "investment". The depreciation will just not matter compared to the thrill of driving, not just a Corvette Stingray, but driving a brand spanking new Corvette Stingray. Mmmm, new car smell. There is nothing quite like new car smell.

Someone wise once said, do not buy things; buy experiences. A brand new Corvette Stingray is not a THING to me; it will be an experience. Driving it will be an experience. Polishing it will be an experience. Taking to car shows will be an experience. Going on Corvette cruizes will be an experience.

If buying yourself a Corvette means that by 2022 you will be eating Alpo or cannot pay the rent, then your choice is clear. Roof over head more important than 91 octane in fuel tank. However, if having KD and weiners or some other austerity meal affords you the amazing experience of a brand new Corvette Stingray, then run don't walk to your Chevy dealer and treat yourself to an experience not many will afford themselves.

My father never reached the age of 64. I am 63 - the same age as when my dad died. I refuse to allow myself to deny myself experiences for fear money may be tight later in life.

I totally agree. A Corvette Stingray is a bad investment; but it will be a once in a lifetime experience.

A great lady by the name of Admiral Grace Hopper of the U.S Navy once said "Ships in port are safe. But that is not what ships are for. Go out and experience new things." My father didn't; but I damn well will. If GM ever gets around to building the darn thing!!!!!!! Three months on order and still NO build date yet. Grrrr.

Just my $0.02

Doug in Collingwood

Well said!!
 
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