Yeah I carry some goop, a small tire repair kit, and a pump which all fits neatly into the corner cubbies under the rear of the 'trunk'...

Flats are rare for me too but I figure if I don't carry something to CMA then sure as God made little green apples I'd have a failure.

I actually have runflats but am considering non r/flats for my next set.
Traction on these OEM's is very limited and they are noisy noisy noisy.
Price is better on non r/f's too.

Did I say they were freakin' noisy?:rofl:

I also have CAA but a word of advice: make sure whomever you call knows that you have a 'vette. Most towtrucks are not 'vette friendly

Safe trip to Bala.

C.
 
OK, I had a slow leak ( short nail ) in my 2006 Z06 on a USA road trip. I ended up buying a high perf small compressor in a town cause the chevy dealer closed at 5pm and I was in the town at 6pm.

It worked amazingly fast.

I could keep filling the tire till I got to a big city chevy dealer. It helped. Only had to fill twice.


I carry it in my car on trips.

NOW, the chevy dealer did say that they were not suppose to fix a run flat and never charged me for the fix... said they didn't think I really wanted to buy 2 new tires.



I drove my ZR1 all around the west USA with no issues.




Brian
 
I dont know why, but it's not the first time I hear peoples saying that runflat tires can not be repair. I am a tire dealer and on every formation whit many different tire company, all of them told me that a runflat tire can be repair if done the right way. I do fix these tires in many occasions whitout any problems. I always fix them whit patch/plug combo and always stay at minimum 1 inch of from the sidewall. Just check the inside of the tire everytime before fixing it to make sure there is no internal damage. Sorry for my poor English but I am sure that everyone understand Stephane
 
I dont know why, but it's not the first time I hear peoples saying that runflat tires can not be repair. I am a tire dealer and on every formation whit many different tire company, all of them told me that a runflat tire can be repair if done the right way. I do fix these tires in many occasions whitout any problems. I always fix them whit patch/plug combo and always stay at minimum 1 inch of from the sidewall. Just check the inside of the tire everytime before fixing it to make sure there is no internal damage. Sorry for my poor English but I am sure that everyone understand Stephane

Thanks for the info Stephane. I bet that the people who say you can't fix them just want to sell you a new tire.
 
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We had a run flat repaired about a year ago with no problems. I asked the guy about stories about not being able to plug the tires. He just laughed. Just another old wives tale that sells tires. I don't think I will be putting run flats on the car next time. Not much for traction and NOISY..... I doubt that I will ever get to half of the speed rating of these tires, so I won't be worrying too much about the plug. ;)
 
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Thanks for the info Stephane. I bet that the people who say you can't fix them just want to sell you a new tire.

Right on, Andrew ---- and the fact that once a tire is fixed, the experts say that the speed rating is nullified...I've read that many a time too. Have you heard that too Stephane-- is it a rule in the industry?

Thanks for the info Stephane -- Indeed I'm sure most of our French is not nearly as good as your English.......Much kudos for pitching in.

Merci beaucoup,

Colin.
 
How about a continental kit on the back of the car for a spare tire. So fifties cool. :ack: Runflats are good for 50-100 miles. That would be good here in Southern Ontario but could still leave you in the middle of no where in Northern Ontario or on the prairies. I think I would sacrifice a TPMS rather than stay stuck in the middle of nowhere. A retired friend of mine used to have a big tire shop in the west end of Toronto. He still dabbles in the reproduction restoration tires. His advice was to run the non-run flat tires and carry the air compressor and goop. They are much quieter and cost less. The last time that I had a flat tire was in 1968. The Corvette picked up a screw last year but I was home when the DIC displayed the low tire pressure. It was a very slow leak. In many cases, you could probably get home just by adding air as required.
 
try not to throw up....

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I got rid of the runflats after the first 25.000Km and now use non runflats.
They are quiet, great in rain, and traction is OK for normal road trip driving.
I carry a compressor, some tire plugs with a few tools, and a can of goop just in case.
In case of a blowout, I'll use OnStar to fetch me a tow truck to get me to a hotel if at night. My insurance covers towing. On our last road trip, I picked up a nail, and got the low air on the DIC. I pumped it up, and once we landed at the hotel, I found the culprit, yanked it out and put a plug in it. I'm still driving on that tire 3 months later.
I'm due for a new set of tires in the spring. I'll go with the same brand of non runflats again. I love the tires.
 
When ever Manny does one of his world famous 4-fer-1 tire promotions I'll be replacing the cement like rubber on my car, as for flats I've got a CAA card. I may also add the road sweeper brooms in front of each tire to clean away debris.
 
When ever Manny does one of his world famous 4-fer-1 tire promotions I'll be replacing the cement like rubber on my car, as for flats I've got a CAA card. I may also add the road sweeper brooms in front of each tire to clean away debris.

I can do that , ok lets see one Michelin Pilot Super Sport $1675.00 buy 1 get 3 free :rofl:
 
That's about the same wonderful offer that Manny made me last spring. In about another year, I'll probably be needing tires and will take him up on the great deal. How can you resist three tires for FREE?
 
I was in my local tire shop discussing tire goop. Seems all goop is not made equal. Some contains ammonia and is used to actually soften the inside rubber of the tire allowing it to seal the hole or around the culprit item. The problem is when you get to the tire repair shop, because the inner rubber has been softened the tire can't be repaired and must be replaced. Moral is check the label.
 
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