Thanks again to Scott! aka Mr Corvette and now the mentalist.

Scott and I recently chatted while attending one of Denis’ cruises. I asked Scott what I should do with my 2023 C8 with 400km, which has a high pitched whine coming from the rear. Scott immediately said it’s the DCT, it will need to be replaced. To make a long story short. Dropped it off at the GM dealer, initially they thought it was wind noise. But after testing and recording the sound and communicating with GM Engineering, they came to the conclusion that the DCT needs to be replaced. No info on the timeline as of yet.

Just wanted to acknowledge Scott’s contribution, and say what an asset he is to the CCF Community.
 
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Do you think they manufacturer them 2 for 1? 2 for the line, 1 for warranty...
Jack before answering this the other day, I thought I should check with GM and this afternoon I had a long chat with Harlan Charles who's the Corvette Product marketing manager at a show we were both attending in Windsor. He confirmed what I was going to answer that it's 1 in a 100 currently for the cars that are built.
Scott
 
Thanks again to Scott! aka Mr Corvette and now the mentalist.

Scott and I recently chatted while attending one of Denis’ cruises. I asked Scott what I should do with my 2023 C8 with 400km, which has a high pitched whine coming from the rear. Scott immediately said it’s the DCT, it will need to be replaced. To make a long story short. Dropped it off at the GM dealer, initially they thought it was wind noise. But after testing and recording the sound and communicating with GM Engineering, they came to the conclusion that the DCT needs to be replaced. No info on the timeline as of yet.

Just wanted to acknowledge Scott’s contribution, and say what an asset he is to the CCF Community.
A good friend had the dreaded DCT issue recently (2022 HTC with 15,000 km used exclusively for touring) and he had the DCT replaced in the same week that he dropped the car off at the dealer.
 
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Jack before answering this the other day, I thought I should check with GM and this afternoon I had a long chat with Harlan Charles who's the Corvette Product marketing manager at a show we were both attending in Windsor. He confirmed what I was going to answer that it's 1 in a 100 currently for the cars that are built.
Scott
So they are anticipating 1 DCT failure in every 100 cars produced? That seems awfully high!
 
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Jack before answering this the other day, I thought I should check with GM and this afternoon I had a long chat with Harlan Charles who's the Corvette Product marketing manager at a show we were both attending in Windsor. He confirmed what I was going to answer that it's 1 in a 100 currently for the cars that are built.
Scott
What is the industry average failure rate for transmissions ? That seems high.
 
Without any stocks likely buildup ; probably smart to add 1% to production for aftermarket. Cars have been on road since 2020 and will be for many years in future.

Automobile industry transmission failure rates​


Sources
https://milta.co/2022/12/23/transmissions-most-vulnerable-to-failure/
https://newatlas.com/automotive/j-d-power-u-s-vds-iqs-auto-industry-quality-dropping/
https://www.reddit.com/r/cars/comments/w4nqar/are_cvt_transmissions_that_bad/
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Answer
Based on the search results, here are the key points about automobile industry transmission failure rates:

Transmissions Most Vulnerable to Failure​

  1. Nissan: Several Nissan models like the 2016 Altima, 2013 Sentra, and others were found to have transmission issues by Consumer Reports. Users complained of overheating, gear slippage, and major repairs or replacements needed between 44,000-150,000 miles, far short of the expected 200,000+ miles.
  2. Ford: The Ford Focus (2014 US model) was listed by Consumer Reports for transmission problems. Ford's DCT40 MPS6 and DCT250 DPS6 gearboxes used in many models have also been criticized for issues like harsh shifting, jolting, and clutch slippage.
  3. Kia: The 2019 Kia Forte was named by Consumer Reports for transmission problems starting as early as 12,000 miles, though likely covered under warranty.

Overall Industry Trends​

  • New car quality has deteriorated significantly, with vehicles now having double the number of problems compared to 2010. Some brands average over 5 issues per vehicle.
  • J.D. Power's Initial Quality Study shows the industry average for problems in the first 90 days has worsened year-over-year. This typically mirrors longer-term issues seen in their Vehicle Dependability Study covering the first 3 years.
  • Brands like Land Rover rank among the least reliable, while Lexus stands out as the most reliable by a wide margin.

Continuously Variable Transmissions (CVTs)​

  • Nissan's CVTs, in particular, have a well-documented history of premature failures and are considered notoriously unreliable.
  • Honda and Subaru are regarded as making fairly good CVTs, though Honda has had some issues too based on recalls and warranty claims.
  • Toyota has introduced innovations like a solid first gear and an electric CVT to improve reliability over traditional belt-driven CVT designs.
In summary, transmission failures remain a significant issue across the industry, with certain brands like Nissan, Ford, and Kia highlighted for having vulnerability. Nissan's CVTs, in particular, stand out for their poor reliability record.
 

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