6

67HEAVEN

Regular
Aug 23, 2010
603
9
Southcentral Ontario
VetteCoins
624
Car
1967 BBC coupe
If you own a C2 (midyear) or C3 (shark) Corvette, some day, sooner or later, you'll have to tear into the independent rear suspension (IRS).

Things will go a whole lot easier with the correct tools.
29qjuox.jpg


Left top - bearing setup tool
Centre top - bearing grease tool
Right top - spindle bearing puller
Centre bottom - spindle knocker tool
Right bottom - bearing installation tool

Without these tools, there's all kinds of heating, pounding and general bashing of parts - a process that rarely ends well. Either buy the correct tools, or ask if you can borrow mine. ;)

CCF forum sponsor, Corvette Central has all these parts.

If you've never had the spindles out and bearings removed before, brush up on your :swear: dictionary. You'll need it. :rofl: And, your car may be way overdue.

Trailing arms and differentials are another fun playground. The reason many of the older cars have issues with the IRS is that even many licenced mechanics have never worked on them. People are afraid of what they don't understand.

Don't be afraid to tackle it. It's months until Spring. You've got plenty of time to mess it up, seek help and then get it back together in time. :rofl:
 
no kidding about rear suspension there " 67 " :D last spring i replaced the diff cover on mine. quite the feat without a hoist !! be aware that there was a change in the diff covers for 78-79 , ask me how i found out !!! visually they look the same, however, there is a 1/4" difference in spring widths. those tools plus a shop press are invaluable bob. i will be doing trailing arms this spring. durn near every thing needs replacing both sides and the arms themselves look iffy. i have opted for the complete trailing arm assemblies including rotors from corvette central. it should make things a little easier as i won't be concerned about damaging anything in the tear down. i feel that the complete units are a helluva good deal at around 900 bucks a side. :D doug.
 
Although not stock, this look under mine gives folks some idea of what you're up against on the IRS. Everything outboard of the outer U-joints on those half-shafts gets real interesting as you take it all apart. In fact, it's everything you can't see that gives all the trouble.

body-drop-07-500.jpg


Or should I say, try to take it apart? :rofl:
 
I suspect my '75 needs some work back there; there's some lateral movement when cornering, especially in left hand turns. The rear spring and diff cover have been replaced as well as the shocks but the trailing arms have never been off the car. I was looking at the spot where the trailing arms bolt up to the frame; not much room to get a wrench in there! :eek:
 
not stock you say......only similarities i can see between yours and mine - we both have 1/2 shafts and spring pins !!! :rofl: looks tremendous, great job "67" :coolgleam:

This comparison between a stock '65 and my '67 displays a few differences.
compare-2-stock.jpg


For example, look at the difference in angle of the half-shafts between the two cars. That's indicative of now much lower the '67 sits. Also, the spring mount is further outboard on both sides, and there's one fibreglass monoleaf spring rather than seven metal springs. The design allows for adjustment to four different spring rate settings. Changes can be made in less than 20 minutes. Same goes for the front. That's right - no coil springs up front.

Another thing about the suspension changes. The riding height can go up or down by two inches in about 1/2 an hour, front and rear. This change requires a four-wheel re-alignment, however.

Lastly, you may have noticed a slight change in tire width.

And, for Case75, here are two excellent videos on removing the trailing arms.

#1 - Part 1 - Video Instructions to Remove Trailing Arms from your C2 or C3 Corvette - YouTube

#2 - Part 2 - Video Instructions to Remove Trailing Arms from C2 and C3 Corvettes - YouTube

It's a nasty job. Just take your time.
 
I suspect my '75 needs some work back there; there's some lateral movement when cornering, especially in left hand turns. The rear spring and diff cover have been replaced as well as the shocks but the trailing arms have never been off the car. I was looking at the spot where the trailing arms bolt up to the frame; not much room to get a wrench in there! :eek:

that's why i'm gonna use a sawzall - make note of the shims and their positions and then it's el destructo time !!! :rofl:
 
Well, very interesting. I currently have trailing arms completely disassembled except for the outer bearing on the spindle because I don't have a puller. I have made an assortment of my own tools to get the job done. Oh and having a press is very handy. I will say though that the correct tools (homemade or bought) make a work of difference and save a bunch of time.

Now I just need to figure out how it all goes back together...oh well there is plenty of time for that. Besides I have a bunch of cleanup and frame repair to to first anyway.

T
 
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