Keith Tedford
Apr 30, 2012
3,801
1,016
Ontario
VetteCoins
9,809
Car
2005 C6 1SB
I was surprised that they still use the old drag chain. The Oshawa truck replaced the drag chain with AGVs back in the big model change for the 1988 trucks and has used robots to install windshields for many years now. I suppose, with much lower production numbers, the newest, latest and greatest assembly methods are not always financially justifiable. Still it is neat for people, who have never been in an assembly plant, to see how things are done. As you can see, there is no time for sitting around reading the paper. There are a lot of lazy dog misconceptions about what goes on in car plants. They might have applied at one time but that was at least 15-20 years ago.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4lGDKICRLQ
 
Last edited:
You know, it really is pretty interesting watching this video. You could actually body off restore these cars. Not many vehicles anymore that you can do this with!

Also kind of funny to see how nobody lifts anything anymore either. There is always some machine to hold the part or assist with the part. It initially makes me think about how most of the people in this video appear overweight (around 35 of the 40 people shown) and that manufacturers spend millions of dollars on assisted lifting equipment instead of promoting healthier lifestyles and giving benefits such as gym memberships/fitness equipment reimbursements, personal days off and rotating duties to reduce repetitive strain injuries. All this crap I spew is very easy to say, hard to implement as people are too "busy" nowadays to be healthy and I fall into this category so I'm a bit of a hypocrite, but I am trying to improve my health myself.

Anyway, the positive thing about this assisted lifting stuff is that it makes it easy to install so I imagine there are less dents and scraps as stuff is installed.
 
I've seen that plant and everything is top notch and more than that everyone seems quite happy to be there.
Their tours are A-1 conducted by engineers and engineering students.

I'd love to go again to see the changeover to C7.

That area of Ky is very interesting with much to see and do to make the trip even more worth it.


Great Video Keith -- thanks for posting.
C.
 
Thanks for bringing the positive back into the thread Colin! I bet that would be an awesome place to work!
I did in Jan-March in 2003 and it was a lot of fun .70% of the production workers are women .No one works hard just steady and quality was a real serious issue .I'll post some photos when I find them in the near future.
 
I did in Jan-March in 2003 and it was a lot of fun .70% of the production workers are women .No one works hard just steady and quality was a real serious issue .I'll post some photos when I find them in the near future.

Lol Steve, when I was there we had to leave the cameras in the car.

Some pics would be good.....

C.
 
Lol Steve, when I was there we had to leave the cameras in the car.

Some pics would be good.....

C.
Thats true but GM took a series when I was there .Lets see if I can get 'em on next week with a little help from my IT guy .
 
I work in the GM plant in Ingersoll and I'm pretty sure there are no cameras allowed. You make a good point Riley about the lifting assists that are used on production lines these days but even fit healthy people get repetitive strain injuries after doing minor lifts 50 0r 60 times on the run. Auto manufacturers have been down this road and it is far cheaper to install lifting equipment than to pay out WSIB claims, not to mention the well being of their employees. I agree that we all should keep ourselves in decent shape to avoid getting hurt too. I don't work on the line, I work in maintenance. Job security for me to keep all these machines running!
 
From the Oshawa workers I talk to, if you work on the line, you are hurting. If you are not hurting, it's just a matter of time. It's the steady repetitive work more so than the weight of what is being lifted. Either will eventually do you in. Carpal tunnel has been a big problem too but at least there is an operation that can be done on the wrists for that. When I retired in 2006, the Oshawa truck plant was averaging 1335 trucks a day running three shifts. That's 445 repetitions a day five and six days a week. It wears the old body down eventually. Laying back into the trunk to install rear speakers is fun as is working in a pit and working overhead under the vehicles as they go by while you do your work. You seldom see the bad jobs on the videos.
 
Old Thread: Hello . There have been no replies in this thread for 100 days.
Content in this thread may no longer be relevant.
Perhaps it would be better to start a new thread instead.

Similar threads

Users who are viewing this thread